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LuckyAutumn

LuckyAutumn

-
Sep 16, 2023
37
Do you ever wonder why everyone is talking about mental health now? Why people are claiming that we "need to destigmatize mental health" but then punish people who speak out about it? Why massive corporations and governments are claiming that they "care" about your mental health? Why mental "hospitals" just shove pills down your throat and don't actually try to make you feel better?

The mental health phenomenon is a relatively recent one, compared to the rest of human history. The western concept of mental conditions as an illness actually arose from the late 17th century, In which the concept of humanity was defined by rationality. Human rights were accordingly justified by one's "ability to reason", granting institutions of power the legal autonomy to take away those rights by dehumanizing someone on the basis that they were unreasonable. But there needed to be a cause for this unreasonability to explain why people previously considered rational were now being confined, so the concept of the mind as a component of health (and the justification of one's human rights) became the status quo.

With the social acceptance of dehumanizing the mentally unhealthy, people considered undesirable by society began to be labelled as such, typically due to their unwillingness/incapacity for socialization or productivity. By labelling people as mentally unhealthy, not only have they been stripped of their rights, but of their entire personhood. What once used to be nervously biting fingernails or bouncing one's leg became a symptom of that label, caused not by the person, but by their illness. These categorizations of behavior became the reinforcing factor of their condition, as well as the explanation of their illness.

Under modern society, we are valued not by our existence, but by our productivity. What once was our humanity became clouded by notions of reason, and reason became determined by social value. You're more valuable to society working a dead end job or becoming impoverished by medical bills. After all, it's easier to make money off of someone who's still alive.
 
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sserafim

sserafim

they say it’s darkest of all before the dawn
Sep 13, 2023
8,689
Do you ever wonder why everyone is talking about mental health now? Why people are claiming that we "need to destigmatize mental health" but then punish people who speak out about it? Why massive corporations and governments are claiming that they "care" about your mental health? Why mental "hospitals" just shove pills down your throat and don't actually try to make you feel better?

The mental health phenomenon is a relatively recent one, compared to the rest of human history. The western concept of mental conditions as an illness actually arose from the late 17th century, In which the concept of humanity was defined by rationality. Human rights were accordingly justified by one's "ability to reason", granting institutions of power the legal autonomy to take away those rights by dehumanizing someone on the basis that they were unreasonable. But there needed to be a cause for this unreasonability to explain why people previously considered rational were now being confined, so the concept of the mind as a component of health (and the justification of one's human rights) became the status quo.

With the social acceptance of dehumanizing the mentally unhealthy, people considered undesirable by society began to be labelled as such, typically due to their unwillingness/incapacity for socialization or productivity. By labelling people as mentally unhealthy, not only have they been stripped of their rights, but of their entire personhood. What once used to be nervously biting fingernails or bouncing one's leg became a symptom of that label, caused not by the person, but by their illness. These categorizations of behavior became the reinforcing factor of their condition, as well as the explanation of their illness.

Under modern society, we are valued not by our existence, but by our productivity. What once was our humanity became clouded by notions of reason, and reason became determined by social value. You're more valuable to society working a dead end job or becoming impoverished by medical bills. After all, it's easier to make money off of someone who's still alive.
I totally agree. Society just wants to keep people alive so that we can be part of the capitalist system. They want to force everyone to continue working until we die. Capitalism literally measures our worth by our productivity. I hate this society so much
 
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TheWorld'sLeftovers

TheWorld'sLeftovers

Low consciousness
Aug 23, 2023
82
I think that there are people who genuinely care about "mental health" and want to make suicidal people feel "better." But they are misled by this huge "mental health" sweep. Society views death and suicide as such a bad thing when in reality it's not. We celebrate and talk about birthdays so much, why is it taboo to mention death and death dates? This is also why the word is getting overpopulated; our aversion to death is leading us down a terrible path. Death might not be "good," but life is just as bad, if not worse.
 
12_Years_Late

12_Years_Late

“May it please you.” — Ben Pollack
Jun 19, 2023
200
I think that there are people who genuinely care about "mental health" and want to make suicidal people feel "better." But they are misled by this huge "mental health" sweep. Society views death and suicide as such a bad thing when in reality it's not. We celebrate and talk about birthdays so much, why is it taboo to mention death and death dates? This is also why the word is getting overpopulated; our aversion to death is leading us down a terrible path. Death might not be "good," but life is just as bad, if not worse.
When people become averted to death and cling onto everything that a modern, "accepting" and "diverse" society "offers" them, the writing is on the wall. There is going to be huge punishment for humanity down the road because of how bad our society has been for the growth and development of young people since the turn of the century.

I do not see why death should be averted when that is illogical anyway. It would be so much easier if we truly realized that the relentless partying & drinking of most people cannot last forever, but that is rarely the case of any society today.

The vast majority of our people may not even be able to have the courage to face reality if this is how we continue. This year has proved this to me tenfold.
 
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DepressedSloth

DepressedSloth

.
Sep 13, 2021
81
To expand the perspective here, it must be realized that society is made up of many individuals. Some of them really do care. Some of them pretend. Among those who pretend, some of them may have even convinced themselves they care when deep down they do not. Among those who do care, some may have cognitive dissonance and/or erroneous beliefs that cause their feelings and behavior to be contradictory at times, and even harmful, while at other times they may truly be helpful. Overall though, it seems the balance is not in our favor unfortunately. The world is an unfair place. Try to find the help that is available and those worth having in your life if you can. Though personally, I must admit this hasn't been going well for me. Perhaps it's hard for others to accept that someone like myself who can easily out-debate most mental health professionals on philosophical topics, nonetheless has severe deficits that are extremely debilitating. I think people's optimism bias tends to be pervasively harmful. Consider that if you focus so much on the positive it's easy to miss the obvious signs of struggle and debilitation. Unless it's, say, a more obvious extreme case of savant syndrome such as with Laurence Kim Peek, or Derek Paravicini.

Sometimes your assets can be your biggest difficulty in other people accepting your disability. Tragic and ironic.

Here's a new example I just found:



Notice how they feel the need to put a positive spin on it at the end. I'm sure he is hiding a lot more pain than what's mentioned in the video. Because people are addicted to their optimism. Think of 'mentally healthy' people as addicts. We have a codependent relationship. We want to be honest, but at the same time don't want to bring everyone else down.
 
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I

ipunp

Member
Oct 29, 2023
67
Because many people and even organizations care more about how they look or the optics, than anything else. They care more to look like they care or appear to be "good." Actions however, will tend to speak louder than words, marketing, etc.
 
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