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noname223

Angelic
Aug 18, 2020
4,169
There was a certain member who impressed me very much with his education and intelligence. He also posted his college subject but I won't disclose this here. I also won't disclose mine. I am I would say in a middle position concerning my subject.


Physics, Mathematical Sciences and Philosophy are among the majors with the highest IQs in America, according to research.

Other high IQ subjects (Material) Engineering, Economics, Chemical Engineering,

Subjecs with lower scores were Social work, Early childhood education, Student councelling, Administration

Do these results surprise you? Do you think they are worthless because IQ tests often only test a certain intelligence? It is quite telling that the social sujects have low scores. Maybe because they don't measure social intelligence accurately in their tests. What do you think?
 
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sserafim

sserafim

they say it’s darkest of all before the dawn
Sep 13, 2023
2,678
I think that STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) subjects (as well as philosophy) have higher intelligence, then the social subjects. I think that the intelligence measured on IQ tests usually is through matrixes, which relies on logical reasoning, so it's only fitting that STEM subjects would have a higher score. I think that social subjects are better at other things, like you mentioned, social intelligence. They probably have much higher EQ than us…
 
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Dr Iron Arc

Dr Iron Arc

Into the Unknown
Feb 10, 2020
18,090
No idea about smartest or dumbest but I can speak from personal experience that people studying medicine are almost all cheaters and liars. I went to a high school where almost everyone became a doctor or nurse and all they did was cheat on all their classes and share answers with each other during tests. This was all back in 2012 even before chegg or quizlet or ChatGPT so imagine the students of medicine even now. Your next doctor probably cheated their way to the top and they'll have no idea how to treat anyone who deviates the norm. They say not to use WebMD to diagnose yourself but they'll be pulling from the same shit anytime they don't know what to do.
 
Banan321

Banan321

Do it once, do it right!
Sep 19, 2023
52
I'm in bachelor computer science and many use tools like ChatGPT but that is only complementary. I've met a variety of people, some incredibly good at socializing, some good at programming, some good at math. Once in a while you meet someone who is good at everything. I've never noticed if someone is a genius but some are really tolerant which I admire.
No idea about smartest or dumbest but I can speak from personal experience that people studying medicine are almost all cheaters and liars. I went to a high school where almost everyone became a doctor or nurse and all they did was cheat on all their classes and share answers with each other during tests. This was all back in 2012 even before chegg or quizlet or ChatGPT so imagine the students of medicine even now. Your next doctor probably cheated their way to the top and they'll have no idea how to treat anyone who deviates the norm. They say not to use WebMD to diagnose yourself but they'll be pulling from the same shit anytime they don't know what to do.
That's interesting, don't they have to do residency, can you really cheat doing that? I can't imagine faking it all through that, they must be resilient if so!
 
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looksminnedautist

Member
Feb 13, 2024
5
There was a certain member who impressed me very much with his education and intelligence. He also posted his college subject but I won't disclose this here. I also won't disclose mine. I am I would say in a middle position concerning my subject.


Physics, Mathematical Sciences and Philosophy are among the majors with the highest IQs in America, according to research.

Other high IQ subjects (Material) Engineering, Economics, Chemical Engineering,

Subjecs with lower scores were Social work, Early childhood education, Student councelling, Administration
Pure Math major = smartest
Communications = dumbest

Do these results surprise you? Do you think they are worthless because IQ tests often only test a certain intelligence? It is quite telling that the social sujects have low scores. Maybe because they don't measure social intelligence accurately in their tests. What do you think?
The results do not surprise me. Most people are capable of doing psychology, administration, etc. they are not complex things.

Math, physics, engineering, computer science etc. at a higher level require strong logical thinking skills as it all builds on itself, i.e. for computer science, you learn arithmetic, then you learn algebra, then you learn calculus, then you learn abstract algebra and discrete math, then you learn how to script, then you learn to code, then you learn physics, then you learn how to combine your coding knowledge with all the math and science knowledge you have, and you create a physics simulation for example. You have to learn all this stuff that becomes increasingly more complicated and layered. Not only that, but also subjects themselves like discrete math, linear algebra and abstract algebra are incredibly abstract and go into concepts that arent even in our world, like nth-dimensional space. Not everyone has the capacity to understand these kinds of concepts. Thus it requires an IQ of 120 or more for one to do well in most STEM subjects.
 
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Dr Iron Arc

Dr Iron Arc

Into the Unknown
Feb 10, 2020
18,090
That's interesting, don't they have to do residency, can you really cheat doing that? I can't imagine faking it all through that, they must be resilient if so!
Residency is just free/cheap labor for hospitals so at least we can take comfort in the fact that those who do make it that far got exploited a little bit first.
 
BlessedBeTheFlame

BlessedBeTheFlame

Acta est fabula, plaudite
Feb 2, 2024
105
Glad to be on number 2, even if IQ is a fucking scam. I'm surprised medicine and psychology is so low tho. Where I live, those two are notoriously difficult to get in. You almost literally need perfect grades to ever have a shoot at it. Meanwhile math is notorious for its turnover rate, as only 20% of people ever finish their bachelors, and there are no requirements to get into it in the first place. Seems to be from England on the first glance, so it's probably the opposite here.
 
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sserafim

sserafim

they say it’s darkest of all before the dawn
Sep 13, 2023
2,678
Glad to be on number 2, even if IQ is a fucking scam. I'm surprised medicine and psychology is so low tho. Where I live, those two are notoriously difficult to get in. You almost literally need perfect grades to ever have a shoot at it. Meanwhile math is notorious for its turnover rate, as only 20% of people ever finish their bachelors, and there are no requirements to get into it in the first place. Seems to be from England on the first glance, so it's probably the opposite here.
Psychology? Isn't that an easy major? Lol my crush and I were pretty similar, we were around the same level. Mine is pretty similar to my IQ, I won't say my major on here because I don't want to be doxxed but I will say that my IQ was tested to be in the very superior range. Fun fact: I took a test which gives you your dream job (it's called the ikigai test) and mine was apparently materials engineer. Maybe I should've been a materials engineering major instead?
 
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leavingthesoultrap

leavingthesoultrap

terminally online
Nov 25, 2023
717
Philosophy is one of the most worthless subjects one can study.
Reading all day about some cringe doomers masturbating themselves on paper.
 
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BlessedBeTheFlame

BlessedBeTheFlame

Acta est fabula, plaudite
Feb 2, 2024
105
Psychology? Isn't that an easy major? Lol my crush and I were pretty similar, we were around the same level. Mine is pretty similar to my IQ, I won't say my major on here because I don't want to be doxxed but I will say that my IQ was tested to be in the very superior range. Fun fact: I took a test which gives you your dream job (it's called the ikigai test) and mine was apparently materials engineer. Maybe I should've been a materials engineering major instead?
I looked it up and at my university, you either need average grades of 1.0 (meaning: almost perfect) or wait 5 whole years before beginning (on average, it's a bit more complicated than that). That's the highest requirement of any subject (medicine is seperated out tho). There are 30 times more applicants than open spaces, so it's naturally a ridiculously competitive major. Whether it's easy or not is another thing, but the people who get in will naturally be the apex of the education system. Meanwhile there are more open spaces than applicants in math, so while some may call it difficult, it also allows anyone in. It might depend on the country you're in.
Philosophy is one of the most worthless subjects one can study.
Reading all day about some cringe doomers masturbating themselves on paper.
It has uses in ethics, law, mediation and analysis. In a way it's the math of social studies, since most people will aim for something outside of the subject, while still wanting most doors open. Characterizing it as useless also reminds me of some areas of math, that are farcically worthless to some (knot theory, category theory, lie algebra), but turned out to be extremely important in the grand scheme. Deleuzes ideas are great roadmaps for education and Baudrillard invented entire theories to critique mass media. Even if it was "useless", I don't get the point. So is film and art, but it's something we humans still independently seek out to share ideas or find meaning and enjoyment in life.
Also, considering this site, people here would either bemoan philosophy people for not saying everyone should kill themselves or eat up their every doomer masturbation as gospel.
 
sserafim

sserafim

they say it’s darkest of all before the dawn
Sep 13, 2023
2,678
Philosophy is one of the most worthless subjects one can study.
Reading all day about some cringe doomers masturbating themselves on paper.
What can someone even do with a philosophy degree? I heard that they could go to law school and stuff…personally I'm an armchair philosopher, I took one class in college and then studied it on my own
 
DarkRange55

DarkRange55

Experienced
Oct 15, 2023
290
In regards to IQ Tests:
I'm gonna preempt some possible criticism upfront, this isn't sour grapes on my part. I've taken several like actual legit proctored IQ tests you know timed and stuff super legit and I always score really high on those. So if anyone had a motivation to defend the legitimacy of IQ as a concept or IQ scores being determinants of
like success or value or anything like that it would be me.

Sort of generally in society and especially among a certain type of upper crust bourgeois type class IQ is sort of seen as a legitimizing factor in the social hierarchies that we have in United States and of course in other countries. But thats not the only reason. There are also some for lack of a better word we'll call them quacks who rather than actually testing people's intelligence will kind of just come up with a number that sounds good.

IQ as a concept is pretty vacuous. Most people who study this stuff in academia regard the concept of generalized intelligence as pretty much pseudoscience. There is some explanatory power, there is some predictive power in the concept but by and large its bullshit.

There is also EQ, emotional intelligence.

Secondly, I'm not surprised because those majors are usually BA's instead of BS's so the math and other science requirements are significantly less. The work load can also be less - Homeland Security vs Computer Science. Also a lot of children from wealthy families tend to major in liberal arts. Some subjects are also considered "soft sciences" i.e. political science, economics, ect. There are also a lot of "joke" majors…
 
sserafim

sserafim

they say it’s darkest of all before the dawn
Sep 13, 2023
2,678
In regards to IQ Tests:
I'm gonna preempt some possible criticism upfront, this isn't sour grapes on my part. I've taken several like actual legit proctored IQ tests you know timed and stuff super legit and I always score really high on those. So if anyone had a motivation to defend the legitimacy of IQ as a concept or IQ scores being determinants of
like success or value or anything like that it would be me.

Sort of generally in society and especially among a certain type of upper crust bourgeois type class IQ is sort of seen as a legitimizing factor in the social hierarchies that we have in United States and of course in other countries. But thats not the only reason. There are also some for lack of a better word we'll call them quacks who rather than actually testing people's intelligence will kind of just come up with a number that sounds good.

IQ as a concept is pretty vacuous. Most people who study this stuff in academia regard the concept of generalized intelligence as pretty much pseudoscience. There is some explanatory power, there is some predictive power in the concept but by and large its bullshit.

There is also EQ, emotional intelligence.

Secondly, I'm not surprised because those majors are usually BA's instead of BS's so the math and other science requirements are significantly less. The work load can also be less - Homeland Security vs Computer Science. Also a lot of children from wealthy families tend to major in liberal arts. Some subjects are also considered "soft sciences" i.e. political science, economics, ect. There are also a lot of "joke" majors…
Do you think that IQ or EQ is a more important factor in becoming successful? Personally I think it's a mix, and that EQ is more important than I previously thought. To achieve success, one has to be smart and intelligent as well as possess good social skills because the workforce/real world is all about talking to and interacting with people. I think that I unfortunately have a very low EQ, maybe even in the negatives due to my ASD.

What are the "joke" majors?
 
DarkRange55

DarkRange55

Experienced
Oct 15, 2023
290
What can someone even do with a philosophy degree? I heard that they could go to law school and stuff…personally I'm an armchair philosopher, I took one class in college and then studied it on my own
A lot go to law school, some go to business school. Marketing.

The "real job" that a philosophy degree generally prepares people for is actually the financial markets. Supposedly places like Merrill Lynch & Deutsche Bank any of these big financial institutions, allegedly they like them (not saying more than accounting, finance, economics, math, engineering, CS). I guess basically for the financial world they're dealing with a lot of weird, esoteric problems and they deal with trying to convince people to do one thing or another. You want to buy this stock right now because x,y,z. So argument, rhetoric, logic all these things are actually very valuable in the money world.

It teaches you to think abstractly (ideas rather than events). Its very analytical and teaches you how to argue well.
Employers value creative problem solving and the ability to deal with ambiguity in their new hires.

A PhD in philosophy is no joke, it's a ton of work.
In regards to IQ Tests:
I'm gonna preempt some possible criticism upfront, this isn't sour grapes on my part. I've taken several like actual legit proctored IQ tests you know timed and stuff super legit and I always score really high on those. So if anyone had a motivation to defend the legitimacy of IQ as a concept or IQ scores being determinants of
like success or value or anything like that it would be me.

Sort of generally in society and especially among a certain type of upper crust bourgeois type class IQ is sort of seen as a legitimizing factor in the social hierarchies that we have in United States and of course in other countries. But thats not the only reason. There are also some for lack of a better word we'll call them quacks who rather than actually testing people's intelligence will kind of just come up with a number that sounds good.

IQ as a concept is pretty vacuous. Most people who study this stuff in academia regard the concept of generalized intelligence as pretty much pseudoscience. There is some explanatory power, there is some predictive power in the concept but by and large its bullshit.

There is also EQ, emotional intelligence.

Secondly, I'm not surprised because those majors are usually BA's instead of BS's so the math and other science requirements are significantly less. The work load can also be less - Homeland Security vs Computer Science. Also a lot of children from wealthy families tend to major in liberal arts. Some subjects are also considered "soft sciences" i.e. political science, economics, ect. There are also a lot of "joke" majors…
There is also different types of genius. You can be a genius with the piano or a genius with computers.

You can argue that there is mental intelligence, emotional intelligence, physical intelligence, and spiritual intelligence (and I don't mean in a religious sense).
A lot go to law school, some go to business school. Marketing.

The "real job" that a philosophy degree generally prepares people for is actually the financial markets. Supposedly places like Merrill Lynch & Deutsche Bank any of these big financial institutions, allegedly they like them (not saying more than accounting, finance, economics, math, engineering, CS). I guess basically for the financial world they're dealing with a lot of weird, esoteric problems and they deal with trying to convince people to do one thing or another. You want to buy this stock right now because x,y,z. So argument, rhetoric, logic all these things are actually very valuable in the money world.

It teaches you to think abstractly (ideas rather than events). Its very analytical and teaches you how to argue well.
Employers value creative problem solving and the ability to deal with ambiguity in their new hires.

A PhD in philosophy is no joke, it's a ton of work.

There is also different types of genius. You can be a genius with the piano or a genius with computers.

You can argue that there is mental intelligence, emotional intelligence, physical intelligence, and spiritual intelligence (and I don't mean in a religious sense).
Also, I guess the barrier to entry into these programs can be higher for STEM related courses.
Do you think that IQ or EQ is a more important factor in becoming successful? Personally I think it's a mix, and that EQ is more important than I previously thought. To achieve success, one has to be smart and intelligent as well as possess good social skills because the workforce/real world is all about talking to and interacting with people. I think that I unfortunately have a very low EQ, maybe even in the negatives due to my ASD.

What are the "joke" majors?
at the end of the day, money exchanges people's hands. Networking is also very big. That's actually one of the big draws about business school is the postgrad network.
Do you think that IQ or EQ is a more important factor in becoming successful? Personally I think it's a mix, and that EQ is more important than I previously thought. To achieve success, one has to be smart and intelligent as well as possess good social skills because the workforce/real world is all about talking to and interacting with people. I think that I unfortunately have a very low EQ, maybe even in the negatives due to my ASD.

What are the "joke" majors?
I would say that without a postgraduate degree like a PhD, or at least a masters degree there are certainly some majors that are much harder to break into that specific job market with, and people often end up getting jobs and things unrelated to those majors. Sociology, maybe psychology with only a four-year degree, gender studies, women studies, history, a lot of artistic degrees like poetry. But something like history a lot of those people can end up, going to business school afterwards or an MBA or law school. If you go into academia you often times need an advanced degree unless you're teaching something like elementary school. Physics at the undergraduate level is still valuable, but you're competing with people that have a specific specialized degree for examples, civil engineering or computer science. One of my teachers got a BS in some science I forgot what it was and then ended up getting an MA in English and said that it wasn't very useful at least for him. I think a lot of it also just depends on what you want to do with it and how you use it. Hospitality is not generally necessary for the hospitality industry, and you learn most of the important stuff on the job. Some things like a lot of police departments, but not all require some sort of degree or some fire departments. One of my friends got a degree in criminal justice, and wanted to become a firefighter, so that was why he studied that. I suppose you might be able to add criminal justice as an undergraduate to that list. Sports, history or journalism don't have the best employment track record recently. But again I think it depends on what you wanna do and how you end up using and marketing your degree.
Do you think that IQ or EQ is a more important factor in becoming successful? Personally I think it's a mix, and that EQ is more important than I previously thought. To achieve success, one has to be smart and intelligent as well as possess good social skills because the workforce/real world is all about talking to and interacting with people. I think that I unfortunately have a very low EQ, maybe even in the negatives due to my ASD.

What are the "joke" majors?
Maybe dance is another example? 🤷‍♀️
Do you think that IQ or EQ is a more important factor in becoming successful? Personally I think it's a mix, and that EQ is more important than I previously thought. To achieve success, one has to be smart and intelligent as well as possess good social skills because the workforce/real world is all about talking to and interacting with people. I think that I unfortunately have a very low EQ, maybe even in the negatives due to my ASD.

What are the "joke" majors?
Do you think that IQ or EQ is a more important factor in becoming successful? Personally I think it's a mix, and that EQ is more important than I previously thought. To achieve success, one has to be smart and intelligent as well as possess good social skills because the workforce/real world is all about talking to and interacting with people. I think that I unfortunately have a very low EQ, maybe even in the negatives due to my ASD.

What are the "joke" majors?
A friend of mine got her undergraduate degree in Chinese literature, and her masters in computational linguistics
Do you think that IQ or EQ is a more important factor in becoming successful? Personally I think it's a mix, and that EQ is more important than I previously thought. To achieve success, one has to be smart and intelligent as well as possess good social skills because the workforce/real world is all about talking to and interacting with people. I think that I unfortunately have a very low EQ, maybe even in the negatives due to my ASD.

What are the "joke" majors?
Another example is my friend's Dad is basically a real estate development billionaire who owns his own company, and he went to Stoneybrook university and majored in philosophy.
Do you think that IQ or EQ is a more important factor in becoming successful? Personally I think it's a mix, and that EQ is more important than I previously thought. To achieve success, one has to be smart and intelligent as well as possess good social skills because the workforce/real world is all about talking to and interacting with people. I think that I unfortunately have a very low EQ, maybe even in the negatives due to my ASD.

What are the "joke" majors?

political science might be a good example. Again, a lot of those people end up going to law school.
Do you think that IQ or EQ is a more important factor in becoming successful? Personally I think it's a mix, and that EQ is more important than I previously thought. To achieve success, one has to be smart and intelligent as well as possess good social skills because the workforce/real world is all about talking to and interacting with people. I think that I unfortunately have a very low EQ, maybe even in the negatives due to my ASD.

What are the "joke" majors?
Or maybe something like Slavic languages and literature
 
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sserafim

sserafim

they say it’s darkest of all before the dawn
Sep 13, 2023
2,678
A lot go to law school, some go to business school. Marketing.

The "real job" that a philosophy degree generally prepares people for is actually the financial markets. Supposedly places like Merrill Lynch & Deutsche Bank any of these big financial institutions, allegedly they like them (not saying more than accounting, finance, economics, math, engineering, CS). I guess basically for the financial world they're dealing with a lot of weird, esoteric problems and they deal with trying to convince people to do one thing or another. You want to buy this stock right now because x,y,z. So argument, rhetoric, logic all these things are actually very valuable in the money world.

It teaches you to think abstractly (ideas rather than events). Its very analytical and teaches you how to argue well.
Employers value creative problem solving and the ability to deal with ambiguity in their new hires.

A PhD in philosophy is no joke, it's a ton of work.

There is also different types of genius. You can be a genius with the piano or a genius with computers.

You can argue that there is mental intelligence, emotional intelligence, physical intelligence, and spiritual intelligence (and I don't mean in a religious sense).

Also, I guess the barrier to entry into these programs can be higher for STEM related courses.

at the end of the day, money exchanges people's hands. Networking is also very big. That's actually one of the big draws about business school is the postgrad network.

I would say that without a postgraduate degree like a PhD, or at least a masters degree there are certainly some majors that are much harder to break into that specific job market with, and people often end up getting jobs and things unrelated to those majors. Sociology, maybe psychology with only a four-year degree, gender studies, women studies, history, a lot of artistic degrees like poetry. But something like history a lot of those people can end up, going to business school afterwards or an MBA or law school. If you go into academia you often times need an advanced degree unless you're teaching something like elementary school. Physics at the undergraduate level is still valuable, but you're competing with people that have a specific specialized degree for examples, civil engineering or computer science. One of my teachers got a BS in some science I forgot what it was and then ended up getting an MA in English and said that it wasn't very useful at least for him. I think a lot of it also just depends on what you want to do with it and how you use it. Hospitality is not generally necessary for the hospitality industry, and you learn most of the important stuff on the job. Some things like a lot of police departments, but not all require some sort of degree or some fire departments. One of my friends got a degree in criminal justice, and wanted to become a firefighter, so that was why he studied that. I suppose you might be able to add criminal justice as an undergraduate to that list. Sports, history or journalism don't have the best employment track record recently. But again I think it depends on what you wanna do and how you end up using and marketing your degree.

Maybe dance is another example? 🤷‍♀️


A friend of mine got her undergraduate degree in Chinese literature, and her masters in computational linguistics

Another example is my friend's Dad is basically a real estate development billionaire who owns his own company, and he went to Stoneybrook university and majored in philosophy.


political science might be a good example. Again, a lot of those people end up going to law school.

Or maybe something like Slavic languages and literature
Lmao I guess my crush is one of the "joke" majors. Wait what do politics majors usually do? Lol I assumed they became politicians but that's apparently not the case. I heard they usually became professors, diplomats or ambassadors. I didn't know they went to law school…
 
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DarkRange55

DarkRange55

Experienced
Oct 15, 2023
290
Lmao I guess my crush is one of the "joke" majors. Wait what do politics majors usually do? Lol I assumed they became politicians but that's apparently not the case. I heard they usually became professors, diplomats or ambassadors. I didn't know they went to law school…
In the United States, a lot of senators, for example, are actually former lawyers. Obama, Nancy Pelosi, etc. Some are former bankers.
Most people that go into politics, start as an intern. Some people definitely start as community organizers like Obama did (after being a lawyer). I would have to look into this one a little bit more specifically, but I know that for example someone in my family was in real estate development. He was a partner in a big company, and his job was to basically convince the city governments to allow permits for them.

As for ambassadors and diplomats, my great uncle, was the former ambassador Morocco at one point. About 50% of diplomats come from the state department and the other 50% are appointed by the president because they were friends/financial donors. Trade representatives, which also carry the title at ambassador work their way up through the USTR. My friend's dad is one of the highest ranking people in that agency. I don't remember if he studied political science for his bachelors but I know he has a masters in something like international affairs with a concentration in business, I believe.
Lmao I guess my crush is one of the "joke" majors. Wait what do politics majors usually do? Lol I assumed they became politicians but that's apparently not the case. I heard they usually became professors, diplomats or ambassadors. I didn't know they went to law school…
What is your crush?
 
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sserafim

sserafim

they say it’s darkest of all before the dawn
Sep 13, 2023
2,678
In the United States, a lot of senators, for example, are actually former lawyers. Obama, Nancy Pelosi, etc. Some are former bankers.
Most people that go into politics, start as an intern. Some people definitely start as community organizers like Obama did (after being a lawyer). I would have to look into this one a little bit more specifically, but I know that for example someone in my family was in real estate development. He was a partner in a big company, and his job was to basically convince the city governments to allow permits for them.

As for ambassadors and diplomats, my great uncle, was the former ambassador Morocco at one point. About 50% of diplomats come from the state department and the other 50% are appointed by the president because they were friends/financial donors. Trade representatives, which also carry the title at ambassador work their way up through the USTR. My friend's dad is one of the highest ranking people in that agency. I don't remember if he studied political science for his bachelors but I know he has a masters in something like international affairs with a concentration in business, I believe.

What is your crush?
A person. Lol what else could it be?