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NotAtHomeHere

New Member
Mar 29, 2018
2
A lot of people in our position are proud nihilists but where are my bois at? Where are the absurdists? If you're out there do you share my support of Camus' suicide? I believe it to be the most profound act of sovereignty against this indifferent universe, how about you?
 
Dead Girl Don't Care

Dead Girl Don't Care

Trying but still Dying
Mar 26, 2018
42
How do you mean? Camus was an opponent of suicide, no better than Kierkegaard in that regard. Furthermore, he didn't die by suicide, he died in a car accident. He argued for the absurd man, a man who is aware and accepts the absurd and acquiesces to operate within in without giving in to either hope or suicide.

I diverge from Camus in that--while also accepting the universe as wholly absurd--I have reasoned suicide as a valid option because of the lengths of that absurdity, whereas Camus didn't think the absurdity of the universe warranted suicide but was even an argument against it.

That said, I love Camus, he had some great insight into existentialism and has doubtlessly informed my nihilistic philosophy.
 
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Vox

Vox

Member
Mar 28, 2018
54
The only Camus I've read is "The Stranger" but I loved it. Here's my take on it all... I think absurdists and nihilists make 1 critical mistake: they base their model of the universe upon the ridiculousness of human nature (which I won't argue!) and overlook the idea that humans are just a speck of creation whicht will hopefully wipe itself out soon.

But think if it... all your suffering and frustration and anger is most likely caused by humans. If you were alone on an island with nothing but coconut trees and parrots and crap, you might still be miserable but at least the natural world would make sense to you. Cause & effect. Everything behaves as it should. Tide comes in, tide goes out, etc.

But because we surround ourselves with human society--ridiculous, inconstant, unpredictable, illogical humans--then the "world" seems like it's absurd, pointless and doomed. I'm not sure what Camus himself believed, but definitely "The Stranger" was pointed at how twisted humans are. The whole thing about the court case focusing on how he reacted to his mother dying, that was so true: human society judges you based on how you conform to society's customs. Crying when you're sad, etc. If not, you're an aberration and you deserve to die.

But now back to the deserted island, the coconuts & parrots don't give a rat's ass if you are emotional or stoic. In fact nature's (and the universe's) accepted norm is detachment, just like our hero in The Stranger.

So that leads me to the thin thread of stability that keeps me from painting the walls with my brains every day. Sure, humans suck, human society is totally upside down, and there's no sign that humanity will ever amount to anything in the cosmic scheme. But I'm still curious about the rest of the universe. Why do planets revolve around suns? What is this thing called gravity which we can always depend on? Physics & light & sound (and even non-human lifeforms) are structured and logical, which is comforting. At times I can almost believe everything makes sense.

Then of course I see my neighbor driving drunk on his tractor down the highway, and I'm like..... AAaaaaayup. Someone please fucking torch this planet already.
 
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MiserableBastard1995

MiserableBastard1995

Experienced
Mar 17, 2018
291
Another absurdist here
 
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M

Michel Angelo

Member
Jul 5, 2018
46
How do you mean? Camus was an opponent of suicide, no better than Kierkegaard in that regard. Furthermore, he didn't die by suicide, he died in a car accident. He argued for the absurd man, a man who is aware and accepts the absurd and acquiesces to operate within in without giving in to either hope or suicide.

I diverge from Camus in that--while also accepting the universe as wholly absurd--I have reasoned suicide as a valid option because of the lengths of that absurdity, whereas Camus didn't think the absurdity of the universe warranted suicide but was even an argument against it.

That said, I love Camus, he had some great insight into existentialism and has doubtlessly informed my nihilistic philosophy.

Otherwise known as the athiests bible, a piece of literature which is talked about and cited a lot, and yet few have actually read the damn thing, and fewer less even understand it, if the absurdist poster in the aforementioned illustrating that, i can't tell whether s/he's being purposefully absurd or serious. Nonetheless I think most read into it what they want to, I never found the work convincing - and he neverjustifies why rebellion isn't like any other form of meaning-bullshit, nor why Sisyphus is heroic - frankly it makes me think camus was a sadist.
 

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