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sserafim

sserafim

they say it’s darkest of all before the dawn
Sep 13, 2023
8,422
I know some of you are high IQ enough to read about this stuff and I need as much information as possible about the big bang and other foundation theories because I seriously struggle to understand the logic behind it. It seems totally random which is hard to accept.
I'm used to reading foundation theories from different cultures like Tengri and Chinese mythology not science. Most science I read is related to engineering and chemistry I just didn't put much thought into astrophysics before
 
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Rocinante

Rocinante

My name is Lucifer, please take my hand
Aug 26, 2022
1,233
it's like 2 am so correct me if i'm wrong, but doesn't the laws of entropy state this? the default of our universe is disorder or randomness and everything must eventually return to randomness?

if you're asking about if the universe is deterministic however, our current understanding is that it is not
 
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C

calm_canine

Member
Jan 7, 2024
19
By "random" I get the impression that you mean arbitrary, which is accurate. There is no overarching logic or meaning behind the universe; things just exist for no particular reason. Additionally, the universe is random in the sense that it is unpredictable: quantum mechanics tells us that there are events at the subatomic level which are impossible to predict. Some aspects of the universe are not random. For example, the set of constants that define physics all fall within the narrow ranges necessary to form a universe which produces orderly structures and has the conditions for life. After all, if the constants were outside of those ranges, and the universe did not support life, we wouldn't be around to see it. Whether you attribute this to a multiverse or a god is up to you (this is called the "fine tuning problem").
 
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EmptyHeaded

EmptyHeaded

Experienced
Jan 24, 2024
230
As with so many things, the answer is: we don't know. And probably will never know.
Maybe it is random and we don't know. Maybe it isn't random and we can't tell (yet).
 
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Pluto

Pluto

Meowing to go out
Dec 27, 2020
3,586
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C

Crinia99

Student
Oct 10, 2023
170
Scientific theories (and they are only theories) tend to lean towards randomness while culture and spirituality tends to go the other way. As humans we like to think there is structure and order that gives us meaning and reason to life. Without it we feel hopeless and not in control, but we we also need some randomness to exist. As such, human beings create structure and order through society, culture and religion and we seek to manipulate and control random events in a way that provide opportunity and more power to some over others.
 
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D

DeIetedUser4739

Guest
Apr 21, 2024
392
I used to think life was somehow predetermined because of stuff that would happen as if something was out to get me.

I know now 110% it's just completely random and stuff just happens, there's no good/evil spirits/karma influencing anything.

Some might find this comforting but it's another reason why I want to die.
 
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Otaku

Otaku

Experienced
Mar 2, 2024
239
I know some of you are high IQ enough to read about this stuff and I need as much information as possible about the big bang and other foundation theories because I seriously struggle to understand the logic behind it. It seems totally random which is hard to accept.
I'm used to reading foundation theories from different cultures like Tengri and Chinese mythology not science. Most science I read is related to engineering and chemistry I just didn't put much thought into astrophysics before
No one knows. It's just theories most of it.

I think you should make up your own mind, in what you believe.
I am very interested in the universe, and all the questions and mysteries it brings us.
 
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Dr Iron Arc

Dr Iron Arc

Into the Unknown
Feb 10, 2020
19,961
I think overall the universe is pretty random, but the scope of that randomness can include nonrandom occurrences as well. Not sure I understand it either.
 
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Throwawayacc3

Throwawayacc3

Freedom
Mar 4, 2024
1,251
It's just an enjoyable read but maybe look into Chaos Theory and The Butterfly Effect. I know Wikipedia is ass but the page hasn't been ideologically driven:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaos_theory

it's just something to think about and pass the time. Not much else to do anyway.

Another thing that really doesn't make sense is that these are theories. Nobody has the answers as to why things just "appeared". That's why it's called "the big bang theory". When you have actually physical items like dinosaur bones that have been preserved you can test it.

Rambling on.
 
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Darkover

Darkover

Illuminated
Jul 29, 2021
3,938
light inverse square law

the intensity of light is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the light source. As the distance between the light source and the plant increases, the light intensity decreases.


sound inverse square law

We can now think of this decrease in sound intensity in terms of decibels: So what does this mean in real life? Basically, if we are in a situation where the inverse square law is obeyed, as we double the distance from a sound source, the sound intensity decreases by 6 dB. This is referred to as the inverse square law.


gravity inverse square law

Gravitation is the attraction between objects that have mass. Newton's law states: The gravitational attraction force between two point masses is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of their separation distance.

electrostatics coulomb's law

The law states that the magnitude, or absolute value, of the attractive or repulsive electrostatic force between two point charges is directly proportional to the product of the magnitudes of their charges and inversely proportional to the squared distance between them.

The mole and Avogadro's number

One mole of a substance is equal to 6.022 × 10²³ units of that substance (such as atoms, molecules, or ions). The number 6.022 × 10²³ is known as Avogadro's number or Avogadro's constant.
602,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 atoms one mole

E=mc2

energy equals mass times the speed of light squared
Einstein's most famous equation describes the relationship between energy, mass, and the speed of light. It says energy (E) equals mass (m) times the speed of light (c) squared (2), or E=mc2.
energy equals mass times the speed of light squared

square and square roots

Squares are the numbers, generated after multiplying a value by itself. Whereas square root of a number is value which on getting multiplied by itself gives the original value. Hence, both are vice-versa methods. For example, the square of 2 is 4 and the square root of 4 is 2.

vector math

a fixed vector with the following coordinates ie. components,
a[3 1 2]
in other words,
ax = 3,
ay = 1,
az = 2,

The magnitude (length) of the vector is,

length = sqrt((ax * ax) + (ay * ay) + (az * az))
length = sqrt(9 + 1 + 4) = 3.742

Given vector a its xyz components are calculated as follows,

x = ax/length
y = ay/length
z = az/length

As a "worked example" the vector shown in figure 1 has the xyz components of 3, 1, 2 and a length of 3.742. Therefore, a normalized copy of the vector will have components,

x = 3.0 / 3.742 = 0.802
y = 1.0 / 3.742 = 0.267
z = 2.0 / 3.742 = 0.534
 
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H

Hotsackage

Elementalist
Mar 11, 2019
848
It comes down to fine tuning, some religious nuts use this to say this proves their God. Other scientists say we're just in a universe out of an infinite kind, where the laws of physics are conducive to produce life. No one actually knows, it's fun to think abou.
 
Last edited:
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sserafim

sserafim

they say it’s darkest of all before the dawn
Sep 13, 2023
8,422
it's like 2 am so correct me if i'm wrong, but doesn't the laws of entropy state this? the default of our universe is disorder or randomness and everything must eventually return to randomness?

if you're asking about if the universe is deterministic however, our current understanding is that it is not
Second law of thermodynamics I think
 
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cosmic_traveler

cosmic_traveler

Eternal Spirit Experiencing a Human Moment
Dec 23, 2023
311
I know some of you are high IQ enough to read about this stuff and I need as much information as possible about the big bang and other foundation theories because I seriously struggle to understand the logic behind it. It seems totally random which is hard to accept.
I'm used to reading foundation theories from different cultures like Tengri and Chinese mythology not science. Most science I read is related to engineering and chemistry I just didn't put much thought into astrophysics before
Imagine primitive humans first discovering the cyclic nature of the seasons and stars. Now imagine the first humans to begin calculating and predicting their occurrences. Those humans created the very first "faith" born from maths. To them maths was the language of God.

Every atom in the universe is born out of the big bang.
The first particles to develop were gases which pooled together to create stars.
Stars then fused atoms together to create heavier elements and seed planets.
Every living creature on this planet is borrowing this planet's atoms.

Following this math, Earth is our mother, Sol (sun) is our father, and the universe (big bang) is our Creator (God).

A lot of people get hung up on the idea that "big bang" means "instant". It took billions of years for the universe to cool down to the state it's in now. The "bang" moment was the introduction of energy to an otherwise energy-less universe. The rest is a ripple effect
 
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