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gayprince.exe

gayprince.exe

Member
Mar 20, 2018
46
Hey guys, here is another First Aid guide but this time, it's for burns. I have written two other guides, the basics and the other for stitches. I suggest you read those before you read this post if you haven't already.

How bad is it?
So, there are four types of burns: first degree, second degree, third degree and fourth degree. How can you determine which one your burn is?

First degree is superficial and the only affected part of you is the skin. It'll be red without blisters so all you really need to do is ice it. Burn ointment is recommended but simply leaving it clean and alone is also fine.

Second degree can take two paths. We'll call them Degree A and Degree B.
  • Degree A is only slightly worse than the first degree. You will get the redness but a blister, which itself will be white, will accompany it. Whatever you do, please don't pop it. It will swell down on its own so you can just ice it and watch out. If it does pop, apply anti-bacterial cream and put a band aid on it. At this point, it is considered an open wound so it should be treated as an open wound.
  • Degree B is a step up from Degree A in the way that the skin is completely burned off but the damage does not go any further. It may turn yellow and you may or may not have a blister. If it blisters, again, don't pop it. Keep it clean and put anti-bacterial cream on it whether or not the blister is popped.

Third and Fourth degrees are the ones that will go past the skin. I'm sorry but those two burns are out of my expertise. It demands medical attention and as such, go to the hospital. I know it's sort of a bummer for those who want to avoid the hospital but you must remind yourself that this is from my knowledge of First Aid which means I don't have a degree for these two types of burns. However, self inflicted burns are easy to lie about and the doctor is less likely ask any further questions.

This one is short but again, the last two degrees are out of my expertise. I was only trained for first and second degree burns. I can't pretend that I have a medical license when I only have the minimum: a certification in First Aid. I hope that this post is still helpful to you all. If you have any questions, put them in the comments below and I will answer to the best of my ability.
 
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DeletedUser4739

Guest
Hey guys, here is another First Aid guide but this time, it's for burns. I have written two other guides, the basics and the other for stitches. I suggest you read those before you read this post if you haven't already.

How bad is it?
So, there are four types of burns: first degree, second degree, third degree and fourth degree. How can you determine which one your burn is?

First degree is superficial and the only affected part of you is the skin. It'll be red without blisters so all you really need to do is ice it. Burn ointment is recommended but simply leaving it clean and alone is also fine.

Second degree can take two paths. We'll call them Degree A and Degree B.
  • Degree A is only slightly worse than the first degree. You will get the redness but a blister, which itself will be white, will accompany it. Whatever you do, please don't pop it. It will swell down on its own so you can just ice it and watch out. If it does pop, apply anti-bacterial cream and put a band aid on it. At this point, it is considered an open wound so it should be treated as an open wound.
  • Degree B is a step up from Degree A in the way that the skin is completely burned off but the damage does not go any further. It may turn yellow and you may or may not have a blister. If it blisters, again, don't pop it. Keep it clean and put anti-bacterial cream on it whether or not the blister is popped.

Third and Fourth degrees are the ones that will go past the skin. I'm sorry but those two burns are out of my expertise. It demands medical attention and as such, go to the hospital. I know it's sort of a bummer for those who want to avoid the hospital but you must remind yourself that this is from my knowledge of First Aid which means I don't have a degree for these two types of burns. However, self inflicted burns are easy to lie about and the doctor is less likely ask any further questions.

This one is short but again, the last two degrees are out of my expertise. I was only trained for first and second degree burns. I can't pretend that I have a medical license when I only have the minimum: a certification in First Aid. I hope that this post is still helpful to you all. If you have any questions, put them in the comments below and I will answer to the best of my ability.
Thanks again for another well written guide.
 
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